Author Archives: Peter Cruickshank

About Peter Cruickshank

Lecturer in the School of Computing and a member of the Centre for Social Informatics at Edinburgh Napier University, Scotland. Interested in information systems, learning, politics, society, security and where they intersect. My attempts at rounding out my character include food, cinema, running, history and, together with my lovely wife, bringing up a cat and a couple of kids.

Talking to imagined citizens: Why share information when no-one talks back?

This is a subject I’ve been thinking about for a long time: the old eparticipation problem of lurkers.  I described the challenges of understanding posting to a non-responsive audience in blog posts here and here, back in 2017, when I … Continue reading

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Community representatives, information channels and citizen democratic engagement

Here’s a link to something I co-authored with Hazel Hall and Bruce Ryan: a paper which explores how elected (yet unpaid) community councillors in Scotland exploit information channels for democratic engagement with the citizens that they represent. We demonstrate that … Continue reading

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Keep up with my current research

If you are interested in my current research in the areas of community, (hyper)local democracy, connections and knowledge, visit Community-KNect

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Community representatives and online communication

In previous research, we have observed the poor record of online engagement of community councils in Scotland, though I doubt this is issue is restricted only to this context. With some notable exceptions, Community Council online presences are characterised by … Continue reading

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Lurking and what leaders know about their invisible audience

Let’s talk about something obvious: Leaders (for instance community councillors) share information online but the paradox is, that they often don’t get a visible response. Why do they do it then? What are their expectations of how the information they … Continue reading

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